The tug "Captain Willie Landers" and the barge "CBC Miami" came all the way from Jacksonville, Florida with 35 lineman trucks and 10 trailers of supporting equipment, two generators and two pieces of land clearing machinery. But first there were vessel logistics and problems to overcome. It was a Sunday,,,

Assist tug helping remove a small barge that was in the way of the dock we were assigned by the port authority to use for unloading.

Assist tug helping remove a small barge that was in the way of the dock we were assigned by the port authority to use for unloading.

This was urgently needed equipment for Puerto Rico to get our power back to everyone's homes and businesses. Whitefish Energy was the company hired with their expertise in rigging high tension lines from the massive power stations in Southern Puerto Rico, through the mountains, to the distribution grid on the island and in the cities. They're not experts in vessel navigation and cargo operations and they hired Blue Water Maritime as agents and Transcaribbean Maritime Corporation as stevedores. We worked together to solve the two largest problems which was the port of San Juan is incredibly  busy with ships from all over bringing essential FEMA supplies and equipment for the AT&T cell phone towers and the large barge they chartered  for this "mission critical" emergency response didn't have a loading ramp.

Transcaribbean stevedores using a crane to lift a ramp in place so that the vehicles can be rolled off. Note the Concrete blocks that they found so that the height of the ramp (once in place) will match the deck level of the barge.

Transcaribbean stevedores using a crane to lift a ramp in place so that the vehicles can be rolled off. Note the Concrete blocks that they found so that the height of the ramp (once in place) will match the deck level of the barge.

I asked the Whitefish Energy representative why they need the small bulldozers. He explained that the high tension wire towers are in the middle of Puerto Rico, through the mountains, with no roads and now that Hurricane Maria toppled 70% of the trees it is a horrendous tangle of tree trunks and jungle vegetation that their crews have to get through just to reach each tower and start work.

Luckily Crowley Maritime had this massive steel ramps that we could use for unloading the equipment.

Luckily Crowley Maritime had this massive steel ramps that we could use for unloading the equipment.

In addition to the assist tug from Mcallister Towing we also had the services of the Port Authority finding us space, the San Juan Bay Pilots scheduling vessels and finding berths as well as San Juan Port Control and Crowley Maritime with their equipment and expertise. All these Puerto Rican companies worked together on a Sunday for a few hours to get the job done.

Success! Our union stevedores start rolling off the vehicles with efficiency that was remarkable in how they made it seem just another ordinary job.

Success! Our union stevedores start rolling off the vehicles with efficiency that was remarkable in how they made it seem just another ordinary job.

There are so many other things which had to come together to bring this equipment to Puerto Rico - behind the scenes - but it all happened quickly on a Sunday.

A job well done. The barge is emptied of cargo. You can see the other ships packed in the port also unloading.

A job well done. The barge is emptied of cargo. You can see the other ships packed in the port also unloading.

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